More data on solar air heater

December 12, 2013

The recent cold snap let me collect some interesting new data. Previously I had reported on temperatures in the building with the solar heat on and off, but that didn’t tell how much energy was being captured by the collector. At the end of that post I speculated on a way to approximate measuring the energy.

Each day during the cold snap I read the power meter at 10:30pm. The Weather Depot website gave me the Heating Degree Days for each day. (Heating Degree Day is the indoor temperature minus average outdoor temperature; a measure of how much heating is needed. Colder days have more HDDs.)

This gave me a table, and I could calculate a ratio HDD/KWH which should be a constant

HDD (55F indoor) KWH/day Ratio
52 62.44 0.839
42 51.32 0.824
33 39.75 0.825

The ratio lets me predict, knowing the HDDs, how much energy the building would use.

I turned the solar on Wed, and collected data. It was a fairly clear day, high haze but strong shadows. If the solar is effective it should save me energy, ie, reduce the KWH that would be expected to be used for a given number of HDD

It Worked!  The Solar heater came on for 4-5 hours. While I never saw the temperature inside rise above the 55F thermostat setting, I used 6 KWH fewer than the HDD on Wednesday would predict.

6 KWH is 22% savings – about 1/4 of the energy, which roughly agrees with the collector operating for 1/4 of the day. The building has no thermal storage, its like a greenhouse that warms up in the sun and cools again when the sun sets.

The water heater portion of the system is the way I will store energy. I hope to do a final system leak test on that system this Saturday.

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UI job portfolio

December 1, 2013

I’ve applied for a job as an Instructional Designer at the UI and they have asked for a portfolio:

Please send examples highlighting three projects in your portfolio that you are most proud of… Be sure to include why you selected each of the three projects to highlight… these examples can be submitted as various forms of media, including URLs, screen shots, electronic files, etc.

This is my reply, which occasioned an interesting reflection that seemed worth capturing here. In my cover letter I had already provided a sample of my pedagogic philosophy, the 3P’s article written at the founding of the BioQUEST Consortium in the late 80’s. “3Ps” refers to three elements of learning science we believed were critical to understanding science as a scientist in a community of practice: Problem-posing, Problem-solving and Persuasion.

The items I’ve included in this portfolio expand on aspects of the 3Ps with my more modern understanding of Internet as a tool for learning: my work at WSU on portfolios and assessment. The third item is two short courses I designed for elementary students.

1. Portfolios. This entry turned into a reflection on how I understand electronic portfolios of and for learning, and their relationship to a resume and the credentialing of learning.  For this piece I set out to share some of my blogging, which was done following my philosophic stance on portfolios, “work in public,” which I learned from George Hotz. Hotz was the teenager who was the first to “jail break” the iPhone. He quit a team working in secret to hack the iPhone and instead chose to work in public. At CTLT we followed his trials and requests for help in his blog.

Hotz served as an encouragement to create the WSUCTLT blog on WordPress. We (my CTLT colleagues and I) sought a place to do our work in public that did not involve the traditional academic publishing cycle. When I went looking for our experiments and reflections on portfolios, I found that the blog was missing.  I had since moved our collaborative blogging away from the WSU brand where this post which summarizes much of that work, Not your father’s Portfolio, can be found.

An electronic portfolio is both more durable and more tenuous than its paper predecessor. Its also more powerful. Its not a thing or a place, its a practice.

It was a prescient insight. Parts of my portfolio from the middle 2000’s have vanished, but my practice of portfolio building has not. Since leaving WSU in 2011 I have not added to the corpus of work related to learning and its assessment appearing in our blog, CommunityLearning, but I have continued the practices we espoused. In 2010 I reflected on my CV and its utility for the new directions I sought:

I need a way to create a CV that converts my experiences into credentials that a new community values.

My work for the last three years has been an exploration of how to help Moscow become more resilient in the face of climate change. The lesson we learned from Margo Tamez (see father’s portfolio link) was to work in the media and places appropriate to your community. Consequently, I have blogged less here, and focused my work in Facebook (login required) and ItCouldBeLocal, a catalog of my exploration of recipes for local eating in Moscow, Idaho. There are three threads to the work: food security, understanding climate change, and urban planning. I seek to learn from, and provide insight to, my community of “friends.”

2. Assessment. This work began with CTLT’s efforts to assist WSU in developing more robust systems of assessment because “[a]ccreditors repeatedly remind classroom faculty that accountability expectations are changing, and that grades, if they ever were, are not now sufficient for meeting accountability requirements. It is a caution that is in part recognition that the isolated perceptions of any single group—even a group of expert educators—will not satisfy the many stakeholders invested in higher education.” This video summarizes our 2009 NUTN award winning article “Engaging Employers in Assessment.” The work is based on our ideas about online portfolios and students “working in public,” and adds the idea of attaching a rubric to gather feedback from an audience. We called this concept the “Harvesting Gradebook;”  most of the details of the Harvesting Gradebook’s development have been lost with the demise of our WSUCTLT blog/portfolio. CTLT, after its reorganization into OAI, used the “harvesting” ideas to gather evidence of the success of WSU’s undergraduate programs as part of the WSU’s 2009 NWCCU re-accreditation. This Prezi  supports a webinar on rolling up student level assessment in support of university accreditation.

3. Course Design. The work in items 1 & 2 above was done over multiple years in collaboration with CTLT colleagues. During the 2000’s my University-level course design work was done as consultant to WSU Course Designers and faculty. One interesting example Meriem Chida’s course, subject of the video above. My personal course design work was in WSU’s College of Education during the 90’s and none of that has survives from my pre-online portfolio days. However, in 2010 and 2011 I created and led two short courses at Palouse Prairie School in a program they called Community-Led Learning. Children signed up to participate in an 8 week course led by a community member each Wednesday afternoon for 90 minutes. The first course I created explored Wikipedia and the collaborative creation of knowledge. It was an experiment to test with students some of the ideas I was exploring regarding Web 2.0 learning. The second CLL course was on making bread, the beginning of my post-WSU foray into sustainability.

What I think is important in these portfolio items is the trajectory they illustrate, from the 1980’s pre-Internet pedagogic focus on solving problems as a path to learning thru the 2000’s explorations of student portfolios and methods to assess those portfolios, which culminated in applying the methods to assessing undergraduate student learning across WSU, and then a return to the very intimate scale of exploring how grade school children can learn by working hands-on to solve small problems.

My own current problem-solving involves the homebrew of solar space and water heating in a new building I am constructing. My practice depends on finding and learning from the portfolios (blogs and websites) of other DIY solar enthusiasts and passing on my explorations, such as the first data from my solar air heater.

First data from solar air heater

November 30, 2013

I have been making (slow) steady progress on the “Cookhouse” project. The utilities got installed over the summer by some great contractors: Nolan Heating, Jeff’s Electric, Don’s Plumbing, Jamin at Energylock for the spray foam insulation and Tom at Avista for the new transformer. I spent Sept-Nov working outside on the siding which caused me to need to get the solar air and water heaters finished up enough to put the glazing on.

collectors on the south wall. Air heater is the set of tubes at the top, water heater is below

collectors on the south wall. Air heater is the set of tubes at the top (above the scaffold deck), water heater is below (click to enlarge)

I built two things into one collector. The lower 12 feet is hot water (pre-)heating. But having watched the sun angles I realized that there were 5 feet above that which get winter but not summer sun. I made an air heater in that area. I suspect the air heating gets some heat rising from the water heater — I didn’t seal them off from one another.

The hot water system is inspired by this design and will be the subject of another post.

For the air heating, I did a variation on the “solar can heater”  I used pre-made ducts rather than messing with a bunch of cans. I have a fan that draws air from the upstairs ceiling, thru the collector, and blows near the floor downstairs (opposite flow from the illustration).

To control the hot air system, I installed two conventional thermostats. One is typical house heating thermostat (on when cold) and the other is an attic fan controller (on when hot). The combination (hot in the collector, cold in the house) turns the fan on.

When the electric and heating was turned on I hooked up the solar air heater. In late October I measured 172F in the collector, 60F air going in upstairs and 122F air coming out downstairs.

indoor and outdoor temps for experimental and control days

indoor and outdoor temps for experimental and control days (click to enlarge)

Last week I was able to do some more systematic data collection on two sunny days with similar outdoor conditions. Nov 21 was the experimental day, Nov 22 the control. What I found was that the heater can warm the downstairs by 10+ degrees F over the warming I get without the heater (just the sun in the windows and warming the south wall).

I need to get some better instrumentation to take more data, but that will have to wait for another post.

——

Footnote. I have been mulling over how to get a better measure than these temperature data, what I want is units of energy. Since the only energy use in the building now is heating, I can read the meter for KWH in a 24 hour period. I just found this site where you can get heating degree days (1 degree-day = 1 degree difference in temperature for 24 hours). Even better, you can control the indoor reference temperature.

SO, if I turn the solar off and pick a cloudy day, I have a measure of KWH/day and a measure of delta-T/day which will let me estimate the building overall R-value/day. I think I can use that estimate of R-value along with the KWH & degree-day for a sunny day to estimate the energy gathered by the solar system.

UPDATE 12/29

I made 2 of these manifolds to fit 9 3" duct. Duct material is 5 foot. Backing is 1.5" of TuffR rigid insulation painted black. Once installed the pipes were sealed in with spray foam.

I made 2 of these manifolds to fit 9 3″ duct. Duct material is 5 foot. Backing is 1.5″ of TuffR rigid insulation painted black. Once installed the pipes were sealed in with spray foam.

 

Inside view upstairs. Hole at top is air going out to collector. Light comes in because collector not installed. 4" duct below goes downstairs where fan draws air down.

Inside view upstairs. Hole at top is air going out to collector. Light comes in because collector not installed. 4″ duct below goes downstairs where fan draws air down.

This is a conventional attic fan thermostat (on when hot) set at 90F. This (plus indoor temp) decide when fan comes on to draw air thru heater.

This is a conventional attic fan thermostat (on when hot) set at 90F. This (plus indoor temp) decide when fan comes on to draw air thru heater.

New Year’s Resolution Jan. 2013

January 5, 2013

My goal is to reduce my carbon footprint with one example of each of the following methods. This article outlines why acting now is so important.

1. Substitution

  • one fuel for another (e.g., replace a fossil fuel use)
  • one technology for an other (e.g. florescent light bulb for incandescent )
  • one local product (e.g., a local food to replace a non-local one)

2. Economization

  • by reduction of use (drive fewer miles [in 2012 we drove: Update on our driving in 2012:
    • Krista’s car (red) 7927 miles
    • My car (white) 5241 miles
    • pickup (blue) 1059 miles)
  • by substitution (e.g., drive a more efficient vehicle, example green cars here)

3. Green production

4. Identify a path to a steady-state economy in one aspect of my life

5. Upgrade my bike trailer and use it in 6 months of the year

Reskill, Retool and Readjust

October 8, 2012

The other night at the Palouse Transition meeting (a group trying to launch a Transition Town for the Palouse Bioregion) there was discussion about Reskilling — the idea of learning skills of our grandparents, such as gardening and canning.

It got me thinking about my experience reskilling with a clothes line. The Peterson Barn Guesthouse needs to launder a steady stream of sheets and towels. About a year ago I hung a clothes line in the greenhouse attached to the Barn and began drying things there. The reskilling amounted to hanging stuff with clothes pins — the clothes line and clothes pins were the (fairly simple) retooling.

The readjusting was the hard part. It takes anywhere from 1 hour to 1 day to dry a load of laundry, depending on the season and clouds (basically how warm the greenhouse gets). Unlike the clothes dryer that gets the job done in a predictable amount of time – and always quickly enough to fit in the rhythm of the rest of the cleaning tasks. Also, towels dried on the line come out wrinkly and stiff, which guests don’t like. So I modified the process to (hopefully) catch things almost dry and toss them in the dryer to finish and soften.

And while I’ve been doing the Barn laundry this way for most of a year, there is no thought of drying the family laundry on a line.  For one thing there are lots more small items, socks, shirts, etc rather than a few towels and sheets. For another, the whole timing thing. And, a big one, the house laundry is not near the clothes line and packing wet laundry to another building just ain’t happening.

I’m now reflecting on these ideas as they apply to our food canning, freezing, and drying work this fall. Again, its more about readjusting how we schedule our lives, make priorities, and what we value as entertainment in an evening at home than it is about the skills or the tools involved.

Local Pizza

September 16, 2012

Pizza ready to bake. The more local half is garlic, tomato, jalapeno, roasted sweet pepper and two kinds of cheese.

I’ve been looking for a new food challenge. My previous one – eating from the garden every month – pushed my gardening, freezing, canning, drying cold-cellaring and my thinking.

My new challenge: by Sept 2013, make a pizza with local ingredients. Bonus, make the pizza with commercial local ingredients. Why pizza? Its popular. It is mainstream. Its flexible with the seasons.

Aiming for using commercial ingredients will demonstrate that our food system is well enough developed to be able provide local pizza ingredients to anyone. It also opens the door for a local pizzeria to make local pizza.

Defining local will be fun — and will perhaps provide some insights. As a first cut, I’ll just track the distance the product travels on the last leg of its journey. But ultimately, the ingredient needs to be local from its origin through any manufacturing. And what is “local?” The real issue I think is more than “food miles” but I’m not sure how to put a handle on it yet.

Year Round Food

September 2, 2012

Shortly after we bought our place in Moscow I read an article about world agriculture that reported the average amount of arable land per person. It turned out that our 1.3 acres for 2 people was average.

Thinking about that fact made me begin to feel a responsibility to try to raise a portion of my food (since, on average, I had all the land needed). I’d gardened as far back as high school, raising a few veggies for summer eating. I decided I needed a goal to push my gardening — eat something from the garden in each of 12 months.

As I recall, Krista met that goal first with raspberry freezer jam. The people before us had quite a big row of raspberries started and freezer jam was a great way to preserve the harvest for 12 months. At that same time we also tried making several canned jellies, the best was red currant but we’ve never really gotten into canning.

Life has intervened, but I have inched my way toward the goal, learning to use the cold cellar to keep garlic and potatoes till March. We added a food dryer which allows us to manage more of our fruit and makes a favorite mid-winter Swedish Fruit Soup more affordable.

The “something from the garden each month” goal pushed a much more thoughtful approach to my gardening. But now we’re long past it.

Last fall/winter I experimented with winter gardening to have some greens and this weekend I will start a small fall  garden. This year we will have a big crop of pie pumpkin and butternut squash for the cellar. Those are the two squash the family will eat. Krista has been making/freezing apple sauce with fruit from the new orchard.

Last winter I started a recipe blog to track foods I’m cooking that could be made with local ingredients. It was an attempt to explore how rich and varied my diet could be — IF the ingredients were actually produced in our local food shed.

One thing the blog was intended to do was help identify missing local ingredients. One of them is cooking oil, so I was excited today at Farmer’s Market I saw a new booth selling oil. I couldn’t stop today but I will go back.

I’m musing about a new goal of one meal a month that could be local, or perhaps all three meals in one day per month. Or perhaps the meal needs one ingredient I grew, several that are local, and the rest that could be local. Of course, overlaid on picking this new goal is remembering what my family will actually eat so I need to tinker my way a goal where we can all succeed.

Vision Statement for Co-op GM Job App

August 31, 2012

I’m applying for the Co-op GM position again. They ask for a vision statement.

UPDATE 9/1: I realized that my letter of application contained the section on experience that has interested several people. I have added the application letter  with that information below the vision statement.

My vision is that, working together, our Co-op will meet its mission during a period of unprecedented change by helping members meet their food security needs and by helping local producers thrive.

To explain my vision, I must digress. It is unusual to have an opportunity to apply for the same job twice and to have a year to think about unfolding changes to the world and how I can better to articulate what is important about them. I’m convinced that climate change poses, by far, the greatest risk to humanity. And the failure of essential US leadership in the international community is already having devastating consequences, including impacts on our local food security.

I believe climate change is real and caused by human activity. I think a lot of people share the belief, but they don’t understand what to do next or why we are stuck on the Business-as-Usual trajectory.

We have all heard about Peak Oil and seen the graphs of world oil production peaking about 2005 and drifting slowly downward for the next century. We have not been talking about Peak Oil per Capita — the amount of oil available per person. That graph is declining much faster because the number of people in the developing world using oil is growing. If several billion Chinese and Indians each wish to use only 5% as much oil as Americans use, our per capita supply must become less. If oil-exporting nations decide to meet their internal needs rather than sell to the US, our supplies could decline more precipitously. I’m going to focus on oil because it’s such a wonderful, potent, easily handled and transported fuel. The rest of the fuels could be woven into a longer version of this story.

Time is important in this story because with lots of time there is opportunity to adapt and innovate. Climate scientists call for a 50% reduction in carbon emissions by 2020 — 8 years away. To get there we need both innovation and lots of capital investment to replace existing infrastructure.

But we all seem to be stuck in Business-as-Usual. The challenge is, presently we are in a recession, and there is less money available for investment in energy conversions. And, more challenging, as energy availability declines then money (a measure of everything produced with energy) goes away. Wealth is disappearing by many mechanisms such as lost work or lost value of investments (think underwater home mortgages). Climate catastrophes (hurricane, tornado, wildfire and flood) are destroying wealth as well. Less energy per capita means there are fewer resources available to rebuild wealth so we struggle along trapped in our high carbon lifestyles. (More about these ideas in Kunstler’s books The Long Emergency and Too Much Magic.)

The Moscow Food Co-op cannot significantly impact any of these global processes. The Co-op is important, however, and I believe that its greatest asset is that it exists as an organization who’s raison d’être to serve the owners’ mutual benefit. The Co-op is our resource, as owners, to make intelligent choices that help us (and our community) manage through the impending energy/economic decline.

My vision is that, working together, our Co-op will meet its mission during a period of unprecedented change by helping members meet their food security needs and by helping local producers thrive.

Price is an important consideration. Over the last year as I have sought the role of GM, people have come to me sharing concerns about prices. Some of those members have lost their jobs in the past year which has made food costs a more acutely felt issue. For a variety of reasons, the real costs of food are likely to rise and the Co-op must pass those costs along. Even while saying so, I recognize that high prices, even the perception of them, makes the Co-op vulnerable to loss of business and to our local competitors. The GM is charged with increasing sales and must navigate these retail challenges as part of a long-term strategy. I will collaborate with the department managers to contain costs and margins while offering the best products and prices to customers.

I’ve spent time over the last year looking at our other local grocery stores, trying to pinpoint what makes the Co-op special. It’s not the friendly staff (though they are) or the natural and organic foods. I think what distinguishes the Co-op, in ways you sense when you walk in the door, is that “we” are doing “this” together.

Daniel Pink influences my management style. I’ve used his collaborative and empowering ideas in the past and I know they will make the Co-op both a best workplace and create a welcoming environment for new shoppers and returning members.

Pink focuses on a view of management that is contrary to popular beliefs and typical practice. He says, “For simple straightforward tasks monetary rewards improve performance, but once you get above rudimentary cognitive skill and mechanical tasks, rewards don’t work as incentives.” For a summary of Pink’s book Drive see this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc

Pink is clear about pay, he says “pay people enough to take the issue of money off the table,” but beyond that point three other factors lead to better work performance and personal satisfaction: Autonomy, Mastery, Purpose.

Autonomy – employees need autonomy in aspects of their job. Management often runs afoul of this goal. Management is great if you want compliance, but if you want engagement with the job and attention to solving novel emerging challenges, self-direction is better.

Mastery – the urge we all have to get better at stuff. Its why people play musical instruments or undertake other personal challenges during their free time.

Purpose – the chance to make a meaningful contribution. The reward is intrinsic, it stems from making a personally important contribution and having the opportunity to make that the best contribution possible. In his TED talk, Pink gives an extended example of these ideas using Wikipedia vs. Microsoft’s Encarta encyclopedia project.

I see evidence of Pink’s ideas already in place at the Co-op (among employees, volunteers and members) and intend to lead in ways that continues and extends this successful culture. Much as the Tuesday Growers Market (invite your competitors to sell in your parking lot) functions in wonderful and counter-intuitive ways, I believe that with some autonomy and opportunity to strive toward mastery, our Co-op community can invent more ways to leverage our collective resources to meet each of the Co-op’s strategic goals:  Strengthen Co-op community; Create and maintain the best working environment in Moscow; Develop and support the local, organic and sustainable goods economy; Incorporate values of environmental sustainability into facility; and Increase community engagement, outreach, and education.

I will find ways to help the Co-op meet its mission by supporting sound retail practices and by creating and supporting the flowering of more community food resources. I’ll continue the various ways the Co-op organizes and cooperates with the web of resources in our community to — local growers, home gardeners, and food professionals. I believe it will contribute to creating the best workplace and the intelligent response that will be needed as the Co-op and its members adapt to the changing energy and climate times ahead.

It is this idea of “we together” that is the other important consideration in my vision. The Co-op is more than a grocery store. What other grocery runs a newspaper, invites competitors to sell from its parking lot, or organizes social awareness events? We (the members) want to do this and we do it with money that other grocery stores call “profit.” The GM is the agent of the Board, the “face” of and for the Co-op. Attending to the “Triple Bottom Line” (people, planet, profit) is essential to weathering coming changes and I will collaborate with the Board, members and staff as together we prioritize our Co-op’s activities and look out for our wider collective economic benefit.

Addition 9/1

841 Travois Way
Moscow, ID 83843

August 31, 2012

GM Search Committee

%Colette DePhelps, Chair, GM Search Committee

Moscow Food Co-op

PO Box 9485

Moscow, ID 83843

I’m excited to be applying for the position of General Manager of the Moscow Food Co-op. It’s an unusual event to apply for the same position twice and to have a year to reflect and further prepare. Last year I spoke about being invited to apply by members of the search committee and how that prompted me to reflect on the role of the Co-op in our community and why I found the job of GM an important thing for me to do. In the application process last year I became aware of a community need that was outside the scope of the Co-op, but contributes to our developing local food systems: Moscow lacks sufficient commercial kitchen space to serve food entrepreneurs and the value-added processing needs of growers. Over the course of the past year I have located financing and designed and am now building a shared use commercial kitchen, an expansion of our very successful Peterson Barn Guesthouse. More on my reflections this past year appear later in this letter and in my vision statement.

As you will see in my resume, I’ve done a diverse range of things in the last 35 years, from running companies that design physiology software and timber frame buildings to managing teams of IT and instructional professionals and building community around shared purposes. The most complex business I’ve started is Palouse Prairie School.

I appreciate that the Co-op must be a business first, that it needs to keep costs low, maintain reasonable margins on the goods its sells, maintain a cash reserve and strive to retain some earnings each year for capital developments. It is these sound business practices that have allowed the organization to flourish. Retained earnings are the resource that can support the Co-op’s strategic outreach and sustainability initiatives. I have four years experience with the Palouse Prairie School budget, creating the first ones to gain the school’s charter and then overseeing three years of operations as Board Chair. The budget at the school is nearly $1 million for the coming school year. My reference BJ Swanson consulted with me several times in the process creating the budget for the launch of Palouse Prairie School and more recently the financing for the commercial kitchen. She can speak to you more about my understandings of successful operation of a complex business. The School’s architect Jerry Brotnov can speak to my can-do abilities during the critical steps of remodeling the building and opening the school.

Further bottom-line accountability experience comes from my other business experiences. My second largest business experience was From the Heart Software from 1989-93. The company developed software funded by a series of Federal grants. This gave me an introduction to balance sheets, accounting practices and labor management. The software sold to a very limited market in medical education. That venture closed shortly after we moved to Moscow. The experience taught me about the revenue needed to sustain a business operation (as opposed to capital to launch it). Peterson Barn Guesthouse that I run with my wife Krista, is my longest running venture. We built the Barn over several years, paying cash to capitalize it. That allowed us to manage with low revenues during the first several years of operation. The Barn rented over 180 days in 2011, and its success is allowing us to expand.

I am interested in your position because I see that the goals, strategic plans and policies of the Moscow Food Co-op are working on issues that I find increasingly urgent. What is important to me is focusing on local sustainability. I care about wider environmental issues, but I can’t do much to solve them. I believe I can contribute to Moscow’s successful transition through these changing economic/energy/climate times.

Central to my concerns for our community’s sustainability are issues of food security. There are two aspects to this concern. As fuel prices rise, people in our community will be faced with hard choices and knowing how to use bulk and local fresh foods could be important to achieving good nutrition. Local food production may also help buffer our community from prices and shocks inherent in global markets and our long supply lines.

One of the things that I admire about the Co-op, more as organization than store, is the way it leverages its resources for the community. Dime-in-Time and Impulse Giving are examples — by identifying worthy activities in the community and creating a donation mechanism, the Co-op has allowed micro fund raising to help new small initiatives, leveraging its members and shoppers without significant costs to itself. The Co-op’s charitable giving, aligned with its policy goals is also an important contribution to the community. This philanthropy is even more important now with the City of Moscow’s elimination of its small community grants program. My reference Tom Lamar can share his understandings of the ways in which I have helped organize in the community for local projects and to foster civil dialog and community engagement.

The General Manager of the Co-op needs to work within a complex ecology, responding to a Board and serving as a representative of the organization to multiple communities, among them, active members and shoppers. My reference Nathan Alford can speak to these ideas. We have discussed his paper’s front-page coverage of the Co-op GM search, and how that is very different from the way they treat managerial changes at other grocery stores. This difference is further evidence that the Co-op is more than a grocery store, and of the important role the GM has within the larger Moscow community.

In the creation of Palouse Prairie School, I have served in the role of Board chair both on the founding board, and in the transition to a governing board. It was a context in which I needed to navigate a various of Moscow’s communities seeking allies, resources and support. The Board’s transition from Founders to governing was also a very important lesson in roles, which leads me to have a deep appreciation of the importance of the Co-op’s policy governance model. Palouse Prairie is striving to implement a similar model.

While your job description does not state retail experience is a minimum requirement, in the GM search last year, some expressed concern that I lack retail experience.

First, I am open to admitting what I don’t know and have a management style that anticipates trusting and learning from the current (clearly successful) staff. Previously the Co-op hired an interim store manager and it may be that the store has reached the size where such a position should be permanent. I will seek the advice of the staff regarding such a move, or additional training that would allow them and me to be more effective.

Second, the job is much wider in scope than managing the daily retail decisions. I have subscribed to the CGIN email list to see what Co-op managers discuss. The issues have ranged from choosing Point-of-Sale software, to unplanned capital expenses, to navigating a change from senior citizen discounts to SNAP benefits, to disposal of property left at the store by a bankrupt supplier. The “How to start a Food Co-op” tutorial on the CGIN site has given me insights into rules of thumb for the balance sheet and the role of member capital in the mix of Co-op assets.

Finally, I expect to get more training both from the current staff and from the Co-op’s network of consultants and resources.

I have a range of other managerial experiences spanning two decades. During the 90’s in the College of Education, I implemented the transition of an organization that did not use much technology for productivity to one that explored the Internet for extended teaching and learning opportunities. That job required me to direct a staff of graduate students in daily tasks and to translate the Dean’s goals into practical implementations.

Those managerial experiences continued when I moved to the Center for Teaching Learning and Technology, but with a university-wide scope and with professional staff under my direction. My role of Assistant Director was to facilitate our unit collaborating with staff in other units. It also involved me more directly in HR activities, hiring, termination and performance evaluation.  My reference Doug Baker can speak to my imagination, critical and creative thinking and skills working in these managerial roles. Doug can give you a broad overview of my leadership and management. You are also welcome to speak with my former Director in CTLT, Gary Brown for a closer look.

The work with Expeditionary Learning and its emphasis on collaboration as a strategy for learning and working had introduced me to a language about decision-making. They call it the ABCD model:

  • A-type decisions. Only the leader makes the decision.
  • B-type decisions. The leader makes the decision after gathering input and perspectives, especially from key stakeholders.
  • C-type decisions. The decision is collaboratively made; the leader frames the context and decision-making process.
  • D-type decisions. The leader delegates the decision to another group, while remaining accountable for the outcome.

What I find important about this language is that it helps everyone talk (at a meta-level) about how decisions are made and gives clarity about the way the leader will be treating advice and input. In my approach as GM of the Co-op I will seek mostly to use the other forms of decisions whenever possible, but I recognize there will necessarily be some A-type decisions.

References

Obviously, since I have been a member of the community for 20+ years there are many people who can share perspectives on my abilities. The people below represent a cross-section of perspectives and have agreed to speak with the committee

  • Doug Baker, UI Provost (208) 885-6448 dougbaker@uidaho.edu
  • Nathan Alford, Publisher, Daily News (208) 882-5561 alford@dnews.com
  • Tom Lamar, PCEI Executive Director, (208) 882-1444 lamar@pcei.org
  • BJ Swanson, Director LEDC (208) 301-1221 bjswanson@gmail.com
  • Gary Brown, Associate Vice Provost for Academic Excellence, Portland State Univ. (503) 725-9149 browng@pdx.edu
  • Jerry Brotnov, Brotnov Architecture and Planning  (509) 758-2512 brotarch@clearwire.net

Salary Requirements

My salary at WSU was $65,763 for the 12 months ending December 2010. If the committee is interested in my application, I would not want that salary to be a barrier to opening a conversation.

Thank you for your consideration,

Nils Peterson

Attachments:

Vision Statement

Curriculum Vita

Something’s Different

August 13, 2012

I went out to Elk City, ID on Friday in mid-July. The weather service had red posted flag warnings for the weekend for the whole Payette and Nez Perce National Forests. I was mentally prepared for high winds and dry lightening and to leave on short notice.

I left Grangeville about 8PM. It had been a sunny and hot day, but when I got down to the South Fork of the Clearwater it was cool and I opened the car windows to enjoy an evening drive 50 miles to Elk City. Above Golden, ID, there was fog halfway down the hillsides. It was quite, calm and cool. The road showed signs of a recent rain.

At the cabin everything was wet from rain, it was sprinkling and just 65 degrees. The morning broke clear and cool. I did fire suppression and firewood gathering on the hill near the cabin. The day was sunny but the temperature pleasant for the work. At 4PM the wind got gusty and a few fat rain drops fell. I cleaned up my tools and was on the porch with a beer when the power went out. Before I could decide to BBQ dinner the power was back and it started lightly raining. There was regular thunder and lightening. Counting the time from flash to boom it was not nearby, but the sounds were intense and long. All told we got maybe 1/4 inch of rain, there were puddles everywhere. The rain quit and it started clearing by 6PM.

By 8:30 I headed to bed and shortly after it started to rain hard. I fell asleep to the sound. I awoke at 6AM, the valley was quiet, fog hung a few hundred feet up. The temp was in the 50s. Then BOOM. I didn’t see the lightening, but the thunder was loud. I’ve never seen morning lightening on a cool foggy day. Where does the energy come from? Must be upper level winds. By 7AM a light rain had started again.

GMO Foods – what’s the problem?

August 9, 2012

Cara Santa Maria just posted an item in her Talk Nerdy to Me Huffington Post column purporting to explore the question of why there is opposition to GMO foods. On one side she has a university researcher and on the other she refers to ‘extremests.’ His argument, that she appears to endorse, is humans have altered the genetics of organisms for 1000’s of years by doing breeding and trans-genetric manipulation is just another way to alter the genetics. In fact, he suggests it it much better controlled — rather than mix the whole genome of two organisms by breeding them, these techniques.move specific genes with known functions. More precise, he implies.

This AM I got to thinking about the piece and generating a list of questions that were not addressed and might be sources of concern. Its just a list, not prioritized, and no attempt is made to answer the questions here.

Who owns the resulting organism, and what are the implications if it is private property? For example, can a person freely save, share and replant seed?

Can the organsim readily transmit its new genetic endowment to related non-endowed organisms? Ie, can pollen from one field pollute the genetics of a nearby field? If so, can the farmer who has a practice of saving his non-GMO seed continue to do that, or is the cross-pollenated seed now private property? Has this infringed on the practices of the non-GMO grower?

Given the tendency of industrial agriculture to focus on a few varieties, how is genetic diversity maintained and who controls the gene bank of non-GMO varieties?

What are the effects (and side effects) of the protein that the new gene codes for? On who or what? Consider gluten, an allergen for some people. What if the gluten gene were added to corn and rice because of some benefit it conferred on the plant?

What if we don’t know that the new organism is a problem, but discover that later (for example, dawning recognition of gluten intolerance), can we back the GMO organism out of the ecosystem if it turns out not to be a good thing?

Are there other questions I’ve missed? Are there resources that are addressing these questions?